Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Date: Wednesday, 22/Sept/2021
9:00am - 10:30am13.3 Exploration and extraction of key battery commodities for e-mobility
Session Chair: Andreas Barth, Beak Consultants GmbH
Session Chair: Stephan Peters, DMT GmbH & Co. KG

The growing need for energy storage for e-mobility and other battery-intense applications has created a large interest in the key battery commodity Lithium (Li) as well as other critical raw materials like Ni, Co, Cu and graphite. Current forecasts assume that Li-ion battery technologies will be the prevalent battery technology for the foreseeable future. Especially the need for e-vehicle batteries with high energy densities will see the demand for Li increase more than 3-fold until 2025. The strongly growing demand for raw materials used in e-mobility have raised concerns regarding the long-term supply availability of these commodities.The session shall highlight current activities in exploration and extraction of critical raw materials for e-mobility and availability of resources and reserves in Europe and worldwide. 

 
9:00am - 10:30am1.5 Dating and Rating Landscape Evolution with Geochemical Methods on Geomorphic to Geologic Time Scales
Session Chair: Andrea Madella, Universität Tübingen
Session Chair: Sarah Falkowski, University of Tübingen
Session Chair: Paul Reinhold Eizenhöfer, University of Tübingen
Session Chair: Christoph Glotzbach, University Tübingen

The Earth's surface is under constant change. Tectonic, climatic, biogenic and anthropogenic forcings have a measurable impact on erosion, weathering and surface uplift. Information on the interactions among these processes and their spatio-temporal distribution can be inferred from observations of the available geologic archives. These involve, among others, the morphology and the geochemical-mineralogical composition of exposed bedrock, sedimentary products and soils. In order to successfully predict future landscape responses, it is therefore important to investigate these archives and to quantify the timing and rate of past landscape changes in response to the different forcings. In this session, we gather contributions involving state-of-the-art applications of geochronologic, thermochronologic and geochemical methods, aiming to quantify dates and rates of landscape change. In particular, we welcome any field-, laboratory- and/or modeling-based study, covering a range of timescales (hundreds to millions years), spatial scales (hillslope, catchment, orogen) and techniques (e.g. cosmogenic nuclides, thermochronology, luminescence, isotopic dating, etc...).

 
9:00am - 10:30am8.3 Mineral and rock magnetism for reservoir characterization
Session Chair: Agnes Kontny, KIT
Session Chair: Katarzyna Dudzisz, KIT

Magnetic properties of rocks show a wide range of geoscience applications and they are rapid and non-destructive to measure. Magnetic susceptibility is one of the most common magnetic parameters that allows to distinguish between different rock types and to understand geological processes that are related to Fe-mineralogy. The physical basis for the discrimination is the nature of magnetic minerals, their distribution, and grain size. Thus, magnetic methods show great potential for reservoir rock characterization, fabric determination, ore deposits, environmental issues, and even pore fabric studies. We particularly encourage contributions dealing with reservoir characterization applying magnetic methods from all areas of geology including method developments and applications of magnetic methods in all kinds of geological reservoir characterization. 

 
9:00am - 10:30am4.1/2 Tectonic Systems (TSK Open Session)
Session Chair: Niko Froitzheim, Universität Bonn
Session Chair: Dennis Quandt, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

4.1: Veins are common structures in rocks and occur in different geological settings ranging from continental to oceanic crustal environments. They form by mineral precipitation from a fluid phase within a dilatational site or due to displacive mineral growth. Veins may form under a range of temperatures and pressures and precipitate from fluids of different origin. As a result, vein structures and microtextures as well as mineralogical, elemental, and isotopic compositions vary depending on the geological environment and local to regional physicochemical conditions. Therefore, veins are ubiquitous structures in the geological record and represent an insightful geological material and tool to answer diverse research questions. In previous studies, vein microtextures and geochemical compositions of vein minerals have been widely used to reconstruct kinematic histories of rocks and to quantify the physicochemical conditions under which veins formed, respectively. Thus, this session invites contributions from structural geology using veins as stress and strain indicators, geochemical studies investigating elemental and isotopic vein mineral compositions such as fluid-rock interactions, laboratory as well as numerical experiments simulating natural vein microtextures, and applied geosciences dealing with ore mineralization hosted in veins. 

4.2: We invite contributions from the fields of tectonics, structural geology, and crystalline geology. Regional and process-oriented studies from all kinds of active or fossil tectonic settings are welcome – rifting, ocean spreading, subduction, collision, transform, as well as intra-plate deformation. Studies dealing with the development of methods related to the deformation of crust and lithosphere from the micro-scale to plate scale are also invited.

 
9:00am - 10:30am7.1-1 Spectroscopic methods in modern geosciences
Session Chair: Melanie Kaliwoda, SNSB /LMU
Session Chair: Jörg Göttlicher, KIT

Spectroscopic methods with their capability to gain information on atoms and molecules are becoming more and more relevant in earth sciences in order to open up new fields of research and to solve problems in the various scientific disciplines. Therefore, it is important to have an exchange, which methods are especially suitable for different requirements. The session Spectroscopic methods in modern geosciences is addressed to all geoscientific researchers who use spectroscopic technologies such as Raman, Infrared (IR), UV/Vis, X-ray, Electron and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy as well as Mass spectrometry (MS). Also contributions of investigations that involve a spectroscopic method not listed here are highly welcome.

 
10:30am - 10:45amCoffee break
 
10:45am - 12:00pmPanel Discussion: "The Future of Geodata Management"

Moderators:  Jürgen Grötsch, President DGGV & Christoph Hilgers, KIT

Panel Members:

  • Karen Hanghoj, Director British Geological Survey (BGS)

  • Ralph Watzel, Director Germany Geological Survey (BGR)

  • Maximilian Ahrens, CTO T-Systems

  • Johan Krebbers, Shell & OSDU

 
12:00pm - 12:30pmAwards

Rolf-und-Marlies-Teichmüller-Preis 2020: Prof. Dr. Walter Riegel

Serge-von-Bubnoff-Medaille 2021: Prof. Dr. Jan-Michael Lange

Eugen-Seibold-Medaille 2021: Dr. Hella Wittmann-Oelze

 
12:30pm - 1:30pmBreak
 
12:30pm - 1:30pmEarly Career Researcher Event from jDGGV
Session Chair: Iris Arndt, Goethe University Frankfurt
Session Chair: Laura Krone, jDGGV

Hello fellow ECRs,

our ECR networking event will take place on Wednesday at lunchtime (12:30 pm). All students (BSc, MSc, PhD) and postdocs are welcome! We will provide a room to get to know you fellow ECRs and talk about some of the typical questions that are concerning geoscientists at early career stages, such as:

  • How can I network (more) efficiently?
  • What are effective strategies for a healthy work-life balance?
  • How to get hot coffee and cool beer on field trips in remote regions?
  • If I move to another city or country to enhance my career, how do I not lose my friends, family, relationship, and health insurance on the way?
  • How to process my data and pack them into informative graphics?
  • Staying in science?! Do interesting geo-related jobs, in which I can gain personal fulfilment and know whether I am still employed next year, exist on this planet?

We are looking forward to an informal exchange and a fun lunch break with you!

See you there,

Iris and Laura from jDGGV

 
12:30pm - 1:30pmIndustry Event: Agilent Technologies "How ICP-MS and ICP- MS/MS provide critical key data from resources to processing"

Lecturer: Gernot Hudin and Jörg Hansmann

This lunch seminar is aimed at all users, students, and laboratory managers to demonstrate the full range of possibilities offered by modern ICP-MS. The second part will then present the ICP-MS/MS technique as a tool for particularly demanding tasks or connections to laser systems. The technique is based on the fact that, with suitable pre-sorting of the ions in the first quadrupole before the collision/reaction cell, particularly strong molecular interferences and even isobaric superpositions can be processed. In this way, particularly detectable elements can be determined in difficult sample types such as geochemical digests, for which there was previously no good determination option.

The challenges in element analysis are becoming more and more demanding due to adapted regulations. When we look future for elemental analysis, we could think of new inclusions to this where, by certain techniques such as AAS and ICP-OES could well have reached their limits of detection. Listening to the thoughts in the market these new inclusions could encompass; the addition of Uranium to the TVO, the lowering of the limits of detection for Cr and Pb, or even that the determination of element species such as inorganic As and Cr VI become of greater interest. In addition to this we hear ongoing discussions in the field around the determination of synthetic inorganic nanoparticles in the Environmental and Food markets. 

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm13.1-1 European Raw Materials
Session Chair: Antje Wittenberg, BGR
Session Chair: Henrike Sievers, BGR

Raw Materials are crucial components of a resilient and sustainable economy and society. A sustainable supply of primary raw materials needs accessible mineral deposits and efficiently productive mines. Competing land-use issues, social and environmental challenges, declining ore grades, resource nationalism are just a few aspects, which seems to make it increasingly challenging to secure supplies. The realisation of a low-carbon society and new technologies – especially in the light of the "European Green Deal” – change future raw material needs and set a focus in so-called critical raw materials.Although Europe has a long history in mining, it is still widely underexplored in particular with modern exploration methods. A good understanding of mineral systems, mining sites and remaining resources of historical sites will stay of utmost importance.This session thus invites contributions focussing on European mineral deposits and exploration and mining activities that indicate a socio-economic importance to the German / European society in particular.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm1.8 Earth Surface Dynamics and Processes under Climatic and Tectonic controls
Session Chair: Michael Krautblatter, TU München
Session Chair: Aaron Bufe, German Research Centre for Geosciences
Session Chair: Stefanie Tofelde, University of Potsdam

Earth's surface is subject to a complex interplay of tectonic, atmospheric, and biologic forcing and processes of chemical and physical weathering and erosion. In turn, surface processes can modulate climate, tectonics, and life by the cycling of sediments, water, nutrients, and carbon. Predicting the sensitivity of the Earth's surface to changes in climatic or tectonic forcing, therefore requires an understanding of individual processes as well as their interactions across spatial and temporal scales. Here we invite studies that use field, experimental, and modelling approaches to constrain the patterns and rates of erosion, weathering, and transport of solids and solutes across the Earth surface, and to assess their sensitivity to climatic, tectonic, or biologic change.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm1.9 Depositional and diagenetic processes in carbonate systems
Session Chair: Lars Reuning, CAU Kiel, Institute of Geosciences

Modern carbonate systems such as reefs provide livelihood and ecosystem services, such as coastal protection and food security, for hundreds of millions of people. Fossil carbonate systems are important archives of environmental change and form a valuable resource for renewable energy exploration and exploitation such as geothermal heat but also for CO2 sequestration. Over the past decades, our understanding of carbonate systems has improved by the combination of traditional fieldwork with new techniques such as 3D seismic analysis, modeling, high-resolution 3D microscopy, and advanced geochemical methods. This session seeks to present studies applying state of the art methodologies in addressing open questions in the broad field of carbonate sedimentation and diagenesis. We especially encourage contributions to the following themes: 1) Anthropogenic influences on modern carbonate systems or carbonate secreting organisms, 2) Impact of diagenesis on palaeo-environmental and palaeoclimatological carbonate archives, (3) Biogeochemical and physicochemical processes driving carbonate precipitation and alteration processes, and (4) Petrophysical and geophysical characterization of carbonate systems.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm6.1-1 Applications in 3D Geological Modelling
Session Chair: Rouwen Johannes Lehné, HLNUG
Session Chair: Roland Baumberger, Swiss Geological Survey
Session Chair: Stephan Steuer, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe

Over the last decades, 3D geological modelling has become a standard in hydrocarbon exploration and production, has been adopted and is developing towards a systematic effort by geological surveys, and is on the verge of being able to properly handle the structurally complex settings in which the mining sector operates. New, exciting possibilities are arising and new application domains are opening up, which challenges geomodellers to integrate data and methods from different domains (e.g. remote-sensed and subsurface data), and to deliver integrated content (e.g. urban underground infrastructure and geology). In this process, several hurdles must be overcome, i.e., developing standards, harmonization, integration of data, storing and sharing content in a structured manner, and developing services. In the process challenges are manifold, and so are the solutions.This session therefore is looking for contributions addressing the wide field of geological 3D-modelling and associated topics such as data modelling & data storage and sharing systems. We especially encourage the younger generation to present and are glad to announce a special block within the session that is dedicated to honor selected student degree theses and reward them with a cash prize. For more details please visit the website of the section Geoinformatics (www.fgi-dggv.de). 

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm7.1-2 Spectroscopic methods in modern geosciences
Session Chair: Melanie Kaliwoda, SNSB /LMU
Session Chair: Jörg Göttlicher, KIT

Spectroscopic methods with their capability to gain information on atoms and molecules are becoming more and more relevant in earth sciences in order to open up new fields of research and to solve problems in the various scientific disciplines. Therefore, it is important to have an exchange, which methods are especially suitable for different requirements. The session Spectroscopic methods in modern geosciences is addressed to all geoscientific researchers who use spectroscopic technologies such as Raman, Infrared (IR), UV/Vis, X-ray, Electron and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy as well as Mass spectrometry (MS). Also contributions of investigations that involve a spectroscopic method not listed here are highly welcome.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm15.1-1 Working on the roads: Improving the infrastructure for research into geo-societal challenges
Session Chair: Kirsten Elger, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences

In response to the growing geo-societal challenges of our densely populated planet, current research frequently requires convergence of multiple research disciplines, and optimized use of openly available data, research facilities and funds. Especially the Earth and environmental sciences play a significant role in addressing these challenges, but require the integration of scientific data, software and tools from multiple, globally distributed resources to unlock their full potential to contribute. In addition, the number of Earth and environmental research data repositories and data portals has increased markedly, and so has their range of maturities and capabilities to integrate into the ecosystem of modern scientific communication. Efforts such as the FAIR Data Principles, the CoreTrustSeal Certification for the trustworthiness of research data repositories, and the Enabling FAIR Data Commitment Statement have raised our expectations towards the capabilities of research data repositories and infrastructures. Now we need to ensure that these expectations are met at all levels, from individual researchers, to data repositories, to research infrastructures. What are the challenges and appropriate strategies?This session invites contributions from different fields of expertise, including research infrastructure or data repository managers, data scientists, interdisciplinary researchers and policy makers. Our aim is to discuss perspectives, experiences, current or future challenges and potential solutions related to creating an effective infrastructure for the environmental and earth sciences. 

 
3:00pm - 3:15pmCoffee break
 
3:15pm - 4:00pmPlenary: The Future of Geodata Management – the UK experiences

Karen Hanghøj more information

 
4:00pm - 4:15pmCoffee break
 
4:15pm - 5:45pm13.1-2 European Raw Materials
Session Chair: Antje Wittenberg, BGR
Session Chair: Henrike Sievers, BGR

Raw Materials are crucial components of a resilient and sustainable economy and society. A sustainable supply of primary raw materials needs accessible mineral deposits and efficiently productive mines. Competing land-use issues, social and environmental challenges, declining ore grades, resource nationalism are just a few aspects, which seems to make it increasingly challenging to secure supplies. The realisation of a low-carbon society and new technologies – especially in the light of the "European Green Deal” – change future raw material needs and set a focus in so-called critical raw materials.Although Europe has a long history in mining, it is still widely underexplored in particular with modern exploration methods. A good understanding of mineral systems, mining sites and remaining resources of historical sites will stay of utmost importance.This session thus invites contributions focussing on European mineral deposits and exploration and mining activities that indicate a socio-economic importance to the German / European society in particular.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm9.1 Groundwater Availability: Current Trends and Challenges in Groundwater Resources Exploration and Management
Session Chair: Nico Goldscheider, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)
Session Chair: Traugott Scheytt, TU Bergakademie Freiberg

Groundwater resources are critical for the freshwater supply of humanity, for drinking water purpose and agricultural irrigation. At the same time, many aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are directly or indirectly dependent of groundwater. Climate change, population increase and the resulting changes in land use and water demand exert increasing pressure on these valuable but vulnerable groundwater resources, often resulting in declining water tables and spring discharge, saltwater intrusions in coastal aquifers, reduced environmental baseflow and, consequently, deterioration of ecosystems and water-use conflicts. This session addresses all aspects of groundwater availability, both at global scales and in relevant regional case studies, in different types of aquifers – unconsolidated aquifers, fractured rocks and karst aquifer systems, with a particular focus on the Alpine and Mediterranean regions. Contributions presenting new experimental, conceptual and modelling methods and tools to address different aspects of groundwater availability across all scales are also welcome.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm12.3 Geoscience and Society
Session Chair: Christian Bücker, CB Photography
Session Chair: Christoph Hilgers, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Session Chair: Frank R. Schilling, KIT

Climate, energy transition, raw material supply, underground storage are socially relevant topics that require geoscientific expertise but are not associated with the geosciences. How do you bring topics from the geosciences into society? Geohazards such as earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, floods and volcanic eruptions are high-profile issues that geoscience experts contribute to in the media. Geoscientists in geoparks also develop active communication strategies to present geoscientific phenomena to society.The session will highlight ways in which the topics of climate, energy transition, raw material supply and underground storage can be linked to the geosciences in society.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm6.1-2 Applications in 3D Geological Modelling
Session Chair: Rouwen Johannes Lehné, HLNUG
Session Chair: Roland Baumberger, Swiss Geological Survey
Session Chair: Stephan Steuer, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe

Over the last decades, 3D geological modelling has become a standard in hydrocarbon exploration and production, has been adopted and is developing towards a systematic effort by geological surveys, and is on the verge of being able to properly handle the structurally complex settings in which the mining sector operates. New, exciting possibilities are arising and new application domains are opening up, which challenges geomodellers to integrate data and methods from different domains (e.g. remote-sensed and subsurface data), and to deliver integrated content (e.g. urban underground infrastructure and geology). In this process, several hurdles must be overcome, i.e., developing standards, harmonization, integration of data, storing and sharing content in a structured manner, and developing services. In the process challenges are manifold, and so are the solutions.This session therefore is looking for contributions addressing the wide field of geological 3D-modelling and associated topics such as data modelling & data storage and sharing systems. We especially encourage the younger generation to present and are glad to announce a special block within the session that is dedicated to honor selected student degree theses and reward them with a cash prize. For more details please visit the website of the section Geoinformatics (www.fgi-dggv.de). 

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm19.1-1 Regional geology: A key for answering questions in geoscience
Session Chair: Guido Meinhold, Keele University
Session Chair: Jan Golonka, AGH University of Science and Technology
Session Chair: Jonas Kley, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Session Chair: Heinz-Gerd Röhling, DGGV

Regional geology is an essential cornerstone of geoscience, encompassing multiple geological disciplines to study important geological features of a region. The size and the borders of each region are usually defined by distinct geological boundaries and by the occurrence of a specific suite of geologic rock strata. Regional geology is used to solve a wide range of questions in geoscience and provides important information in the search for natural resources. This broad session offers the opportunity to explore the diversity of methods and approaches used to study regional geology and how information about regional geology is made available and transferred to the geoscience community in academia, industry, government, or the public. We welcome contributions on all aspects of geology that contribute to better understanding regional geology on Earth or other terrestrial planets. 

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm15.1-2 Working on the roads: Improving the infrastructure for research into geo-societal challenges
Session Chair: Kirsten Elger, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences

In response to the growing geo-societal challenges of our densely populated planet, current research frequently requires convergence of multiple research disciplines, and optimized use of openly available data, research facilities and funds. Especially the Earth and environmental sciences play a significant role in addressing these challenges, but require the integration of scientific data, software and tools from multiple, globally distributed resources to unlock their full potential to contribute. In addition, the number of Earth and environmental research data repositories and data portals has increased markedly, and so has their range of maturities and capabilities to integrate into the ecosystem of modern scientific communication. Efforts such as the FAIR Data Principles, the CoreTrustSeal Certification for the trustworthiness of research data repositories, and the Enabling FAIR Data Commitment Statement have raised our expectations towards the capabilities of research data repositories and infrastructures. Now we need to ensure that these expectations are met at all levels, from individual researchers, to data repositories, to research infrastructures. What are the challenges and appropriate strategies?This session invites contributions from different fields of expertise, including research infrastructure or data repository managers, data scientists, interdisciplinary researchers and policy makers. Our aim is to discuss perspectives, experiences, current or future challenges and potential solutions related to creating an effective infrastructure for the environmental and earth sciences. 

 
5:45pm - 6:00pmCoffee break
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topics: 1.5, 1.8
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topic: 1.9
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topics: 4.2, 5.3
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topics: 6.1, 6.2, 8.3
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topics: 9.1, 9.3, 12.1, 12.3, 13.1, 13.3
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topics: 14.1, 14.2, 15.1, 19.1, 19.2